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This is the dumbest post I have ever written. You have been warned.

 

I found that last bit…intriguing. Backing our currency with cat videos would, of course, be very difficult to work (backing a currency with something whose marginal cost of replication of zero is probably not a recipe for stability)…but what if we backed our currency with actual cats?

i can haz currency stability

The biggest question to answer is ‘how many cats would the government need to hold in reserve to make the standard work?’ So I went back to look at how much gold the government had when it had a gold standard, and then, in need of a denominator, indexed it as a ratio to national income (using Piketty & Zucman’s data).

look this all made sense at the time

 

 

Rather than over-analyze the data, I just took the average value of all the individual year values, came up with 1.98%, and multiplied that by national income today (just over $14.5 trillion) to estimate that the government would need to hold in reserve $288.7 billion in cats to maintain a cat standard.

This means we have a problem. The Humane Society estimates that there are 95.6 million owned cats in America, and that there are another 30-40 million stray or feral cats. That means an outside estimate of ~135 million cats in the United States. Which means even if the government eminently domained every living cat in America, that would still imply a valuation of over $2,000 per cat, which is an order of magnitude more than the current market price. This would, among other things, be highly disruptive to the cat market. It would also be hard to sustain, since rescue cats are largely sold by non-profits at the marginal cost of vaccinations, microchipping, etc.

So what the government needs to do is breed cats. Lots of cats.

MOAR MOAR MOAR

Assuming we’re not talking about a purebred standard, the kind of cats the government might be keeping in reserve would probably have a market value of around $100/each, which means we would need the government to hold, in reserve, twenty times as many cats as exists in the United States today – 2.7 billion cats. Firstly, that could take a little time – depending on how large a cat base the government started with (presumably they wouldn’t catnap every cat in America), as long as a decade. This is not the insurmountable obstacle, though.

Land is.

Cats, by nature, are kind of territorial.

all mine

One study, in fact, shows a leading cause of death for outdoor cats is…other cats. Meouch.

That same study showed that outdoor cats have quite a substantial home range – as large as 1351 acres, though the average is just 4.9 acres. Even applying that average across the board, to 2.7 billion cats that gets you to 20.7 billion square miles – over a third of all the land area on Earth.

So let’s assume substantial overlap – even if you assume 100 cats per home range, that still gets you to 200 million square miles, 5-6 times the size of the United States. To get all those cats into, say, Wyoming, you’d have a density of 27,602 cats/square mile – which is shockingly close to the human density, 27,779 people/square mile, of New York City.

Wyoming, in other words, would look like this:

everybody! everybody! everybody wants to be a cat!

And it turns out Wyoming land isn’t cheap –  if you apply  the $450/acre for ranch land quoted in this article, over $28 billion.

Of course, total land value in the United States is probably over $15 trillion at this point so we could just have a land standard. That would be a lot easier. A whole lot easier…

 

 

 

Than herding cats.

damn right i went there

 

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Kevin Drum, riffing off yesterday’s epic Mt. Gox and BTC implosion:

Bitcoin, after all, is the ultimate fiat currency: just a bunch of ones and zeroes on a computer with no intrinsic value. But so are all currencies. The difference is that it’s more obvious with Bitcoin because the entire enterprise is actively marketed as nothing more than algorithmically-created data. It’s one of their big selling points.

So that forces you to think about what the ultimate value of a Bitcoin can be. And if there isn’t any, then why do dollars and yen have value? Why do IOUs passed around in prison camps have value? Or babysitting chits? Once you figure out what ultimately underlies the value of these various fiat currencies, you’ve taken a big step toward understanding why some currencies are better than others and why playing games with the debt ceiling is so stupid.

Which reminds me that I wanted to knock down this whole notion of “fiat currencies” in the first place.

Money is a technology devised as a solution to a bundle of collective action problems centered around network effects and the transaction costs of exchange above a certain threshold of scope and scale. It works really, really well, but it has a few problems. A key problem (though not the only or, perhaps, even the most important of which) is the one of storing value – money is only useful if its value doesn’t fluctuate too much, too unpredictably, too soon. However, there are incentives for whomever issues the money (as well as counterfeiters) to take actions that result in just those kinds of fluctuations, as well as outside pressures that make such fluctuations more likely. Therefore, almost every money issuer ever has taken some sort of steps to regulate the value of its currency and the rate at which that value changes.

One solution to this was to make the money out of rare, durable, verifiable elements. One solution was to have private actors issue money and caveat emptor. One solution was to have a bunch of state technocrats issue paper redeemable for said elements. One solution was to have a bunch of state technocrats issue paper redeemable in more paper and pinky-swear not to allow the value of the currency to fluctuate. One solution was to create a self-perpetuating algorithm that fixed the supply of currency units. There were also other solutions.

I think trying to sort those and the myriad other solutions to the money problem into “fiat” and “backed” is as irrelevant as it is obscurant. In each of those schemes there are two identifiable foci from which value regulation derive and distinguish various schemes from each other:

-The algorithm – the rule governing the value path of the currency.

-The credibility – the likelihood of the currency following the value path promised by the algorithm, and the accountable party for those outcomes.

This makes actual, categorizable sense of the differences between various monetary regimes. The algorithm of a gold-standard is “the value of this currency will always be equal to a certain quantity of gold, and you can always exchange your paper for that quantity” and the credibility is in the issuer, whether it’s a private bank or the central bank. Nothing stops me from issuing a gold-backed currency tomorrow, but nobody would use it because my promise to redeem all the SquarelyBucks I’m issuing for shiny gold coins is, sadly, totally lacking credibility. The algorithm of a “fiat” currency is “the value of this currency will never decline by more than ~2% annually” and the credibility is in the issuer, in this case Janet Yellen, the FOMC, and the institutional apparatus in which they operate. The algorithm of Bitcoin is “the money stock will never exceed 21mm BTC” and the credibility is in the nature of the currency’s code which until recently seemed very well-designed to prevent counterfeiting.

The genius of Bitcoin is that it takes the algorithm out of human hands; the tragedy of Bitcoin is that its algorithm is stupid, for two reasons. The first was that Bitcoin’s algorithm was borne out of an ideology which believed that central banks inherently lacked credibility and that therefore central bank currency inflation, even hyperinflation, was not just possible but inevitable, especially in light of the various Federal Reserve responses to recent economic shocks. This ideology is wrong:

tipsy

TIPS Spread

The second reason is that there are better algorithms even if you believe in that (wrong) ideology. A good example would be “one BTC will always equal one 2009 USD no matter what happens to the value of USD over time.” This, of course, is way more complicated than the BTC algorithm as a coding matter, because it would have to either trust CPI or another inflation measure or somehow routinely update an internal proprietary index based on accessible price data, a tricky thing to do into perpetuity. If someone wanted to program and release that cryptocurrency, BTW, it would be a fantastic economic experiment. But that’s not BTC, which instead fixed its money supply, and lacking any private or public chartalistic price anchor allowing for large, unpredictable, rapid fluctuation in its value, thus defeating the purpose of money itself.

I hereby therefore petition that we suspend all discussion of “fiat” currencies and “backed” currencies and instead discuss rules and credibility.

(Thanks to Mike Sproul and Nick Rowe for kicking this around with me in the comments of this post)

Nixon says, "let's not add fractions with different denominators"

I always enjoy going to zerohedge for the most intelligent, compelling, and engaging iteration of the sociopathic perspective on events. I was disappointed, however, to see Tyler Durden submit this guest post from Bill Buckler, who is apparently of this publication. Anyway, in the course of writing some positive things about Ron Paul, Buckler writes:

The root of the problem is perfectly illustrated in the fact that since August 1971, the funded debt of the US government has risen from $US 400 Billion to $US 15,236 Billion. The severity of the problem is illustrated by the fact that with Mr Obama having yet to complete his third full year as President, he has presided over $US 4,600 Billion (or almost one-third) of that increase. The root of the problem is the abandonment of money – the final legal connection between Gold and the US Dollar was ended in August 1971. The severity of the problem is the grotesque expansion of what has taken its place.

Of course this is a giant stink bomb of the “correlation equals causation” fallacy. But beyond that this is a comparison equivalent to comparing apples to zebras. This may be painfully obvious to most people, but let’s examine some other things that happened between 1971 and the present.

Firstly, we went from having 200mm people to 300mm. Secondly, NGDP went from $1.1 trillion to $14.6 trillion. And lest hard-money types wave that all away as ruinous inflation, the Inflation Calculator says that $1 in 1971 is equivalent to $5.32 today, which if you take it purely at face leaves today’s RGDP relative to 1971 at $2.7 trillion, a nearly three-old increase even though population increased 50%, leaving per-capita GDP much higher, which can be confirmed by looking at all kinds of measurements of quality of life in the United States over the last 40 years and seeing them all rise. So we are a much wealthier country now than we have been, and we have experienced a decent amount of inflation, so it makes no sense whatsoever to just throw up the nominal gross national debt numbers from 1971 and today and call it “the root of the problem.”

And look – the debt-to-GDP ratio, which is a very useful measurement since it complete controls for any nominal growth that isn’t reflected in real standards, has tripled! In 1971 it was below 40%, now it’s over 100%! If you wanted to push the idea that we are dangerously indebted (we aren’t, but if you did), that’s all you have to say. You don’t have to make grossly misleading comparisons to prove that point.

FWIW, I’m not even mentioning how deeply unfair this is specifically to the President, who was handed a $500b structural deficit and an economic implosion worthy of the Great Depression by his successor. I’m not sure it’s really possible to stabilize debt-to-GDP in those conditions unless you unilaterally abolish most government functions.

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