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Responsible prudent savers. Totally ants.

Scott Sumner, lingua in bucca, swapped Formica for granite countertops and writes:

PPPPS. Yes, granite is very durable, which makes it investment . . .

. . . and of course saving too!

This, of course, goes to one of my hobbyhorse points – the exceptionally fuzzy line between "consuming" and "saving." The better way to view the world, IMHO, is one in which, beginning at some arbitrary point, we apply our time and existing stuff, through the media of institutions, to make more stuff, and that stuff varies in function, quality, durability, etc.

This also reminds me of a tangential point – young people, on average, probably do not travel anywhere near the optimal level. Travel can be expensive, but when you are young there are two factors that mitigate strongly in favor of travel. Firstly, you are most able to enjoy it. Let me tell you right now that future 50-year-old me would have had a way tougher time enjoying Mehrangarh than the present 26-year-old me. Secondly, travel is a perpetuity, and while most of their utitlity is illiquid, that’s as much an advantage as disadvantage – nobody can expropriate, steal, damage, or tax it.

This is much the same as education, which is why education debt is a bad idea, but while a college degree can be so expensive most people simply cannot fund it out of current consumption, an unforgettable month-long jaunt through India for two can cost less than $5000 including airfare, adequate lodging, and all consumption. Which is a lot, but if you have a young cohabitating pair with no kids making at least a combined $70-80k, as long as their rent isn’t too expensive and neither is drowning in debt it’s perfectly possible to save adequately for such an adventure over less than a year. And you could make a very strong argument that traveling while young is just as much "investment" (in something that produces a lifetime-long flow of happy memories and increased knowledge and wisdom, as well as fun stories to share with others) as "consumption."

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So Ashok and I sparred a bit on Twitter re: the meaning and effect of taxation and spending (and probably pestered the heck out of James Pethokoukis and Joe Weisenthal in the process). I’m not sure how to embed Twitter conversations (if anyone knows how, I’m all ears), but the long-and-short of it is that the actualities of taxes and spending are weirdly different from the optics.

The trick is to remember that every policy change is a change from some baseline. So, from whatever the baseline currently is, there is no fundamental or economic difference between:

1) Cutting taxes by X on some activity, and
2) Spending X subsidizing that activity

assuming that they are both funded identically (though identical tax hikes, spending cuts, or debt incursions).

Now, in practice, there will be differences. Scott Sumner’s thought experiment about the society that taxes 100% of GDP by taxing 100% of income then writing welfare checks equal to taxed income demonstrates that, since we would expect that society really would look different than the one that taxed nothing at all (if only because such a program would have some overhead). But those differences would be based in behavioral economics, not classical or neoclassical economics.

And the same in real-world examples. There would definitely be differences between these two alternative scenarios:

1) A 2% payroll tax cut (debt-funded).
2) A check mailed to every American for the exact same amount (debt-funded).

But those differences would be instutional, not economics (the check-cashing industry, for example, would obviously prefer the second policy to the first). But there’s no reaosn to think they would "crowd out" (or for that matter, "crowd in") different activities.

The real point is, as Matt Yglesias says, the tax share of GDP is a very poor to think about the “size of government.”

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